Think Outside of the (Cereal) Box

Despite the growing popularity in fasting and other ‘detox’ programmes we’re still advocates (in the main) of regular meals with the inclusion of breakfast.  Why?  For no other reason than we’ve seen better results with both ourselves and our members in terms of fat loss, muscle building and most importantly sustainable eating habits.

The reality for most people is that if they get breakfast right, and thus get their day off to a ‘healthy’ start, they are likely to make better choices throughout the day.  This is something to do with blood sugar management and appetite regulation, but perhaps more to do with starting the day with mindful and positive choices about certain goals and overall health.  Start the day with that mindset and it will more likely filter through to the rest of your day.

Breakfast is the most challenging meal of the day to get ‘right’ for most people, no doubt.  Partly because we’re time poor (don’t have or don’t make time?), and partly because we have preconceived ideas about what is and is not a ‘breakfast food’.  Kudos to Mr Kellogg on that front, but we need to shift our thinking and listed below are a few ideas that might help.

It’s worth noting that these examples are not intended as personal recommendations.  What constitutes ‘good’ for you and ‘bad’ for you can only be viewed in the context of your overall diet (is it even possible to pigeonhole foods in these two camps?).  Nuts might be considered ‘good’ for you for example, but if you’re nut consumption is excessive and is over and above your nutritional requirements – a mistake many of us nut gluttons make – this excessive nut consumption might deem them ‘bad’ for you.  Same goes for all foods, ‘good’ and ‘bad’ (might a little bit of something ‘bad’ be ‘good’ for you occasionally).  I digress.

1. Meat and nuts

All things being equal this combo, made famous by Charles Poliquin, might be the best choice for most people, especially who’s primary goal is fat loss.  The concept is pretty self explanatory but check out full details in the infamous article ‘The Meat & Nuts Breakfast’ by Charles Poliquin.

I recognise not everyone is going to make the leap from toast to steak first thing, but perhaps bacon on a bed of spinach and rocket and a handful of cashews would be appealing?  Or a decent quality sausage or two?  Smoked fish….?

Nuts should be raw preferably.  Worth remembering also that peanuts are not actually nuts.

2. Eggs

Where would we be without eggs?  A great source of protein fats and other nutrients eggs would have a place in almost any diet.  Poached and boiled might be a more cholesterol friendly way to prepare them (oxidisation) but scrambled taste good also.

Served boiled with asparagus soldiers, scrambled atop of a slice of wheat free rye, or perhaps served with grated vegetables as an omelette (where coconut oil and/or butter come into their own).

3. W10 Shake

In the words of many a chef, you will need:

– circa 200ml liquid (water, raw milk, rice milk and coconut water work)

– raw eggs or protein powder

– a handful of spinach

– a handful of berries, and

– a teaspoon of nut butter

– some flax seeds

Throw all of this in a blender and whizz until a light green, slightly sweet tasting breakfast treat.  A good one for the ‘I don’t have time for breakfast, but could eat at my desk’ crowd – all keeps in the fridge easily and involves minimal prep time.

4. Smoked salmon and rice cakes

Does exactly what it says on the tin.  Squeeze some lemon juice and grind some pepper atop and you’re in breakfast wonderland.

Fantastic choice for kids.  Mine enthusiastically go for nut butter on rice cakes with smoked salmon (or a rasher of decent quality bacon) on the side.

5. Yoghurt cup

Get 150-200g of natural Greek yoghurt (we recommend Fage Total, who also rather conveniently do 175g pots) and scoop or two of good quality protein powder and stir.  Perhaps add some raw nuts and berries if it fits your nutritional requirements.  Another one which is deal for the ‘eat at my desk’ crowd.

6. Porridge

Before the meat and nuts zealots get their knickers in a twist about neurotransmitters and the like, porridge works well for some people.  Wheat free, fibrous and filling.  Accompany with eggs or stir in some protein powder and you’re away.  Stir some cinnamon, maybe even add some nut butter.

Get your day off to a good start by thinking outside of the (cereal) box.